The Elements of Eloquence by Mark Forsyth is a book on the importance of pure style.

Discover the most extraordinary words in the English language with The Horologicon and unravel the strange connections between words with The Etymologicon.

About the BooksBuyRead extractsFigures of RhetoricLost WordsEtymologyPinterestinkyfool.com@inkyfool@iconbooks

Happy Easter!

Happy Easter!

Inky Fool: The Unknown Unknown

Check out Mark Forsyth’s blogpost on his essay for Independent Booksellers Week! 

5 days ago - 2

prettybooks:

I posted 25 Books for Book Lovers earlier this month, but I wanted an excuse to take some pretty pictures of books that I already owned, so here they are!

We spot Mark Forsyth!

The Poetry of the Trading Floor, Going Beyond Bears and Bulls

Finance is such a picturesque business, but nobody seems to notice. Once upon a time, for instance, all that you needed to start a bank was a bench. You put your bench up in a square in medieval Italy and sat down behind it to do business. The Italian for bench is banca, and hence our modern word bankRead Mark Forsyth’s article in The New York Times

6 days ago - 2

Inky Fool: Hungry Rhetoric

Mark Forsyth talks about what makes ‘If we burn, you burn with us’ from Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins so memorable in his latest blogpost.

1 week ago - 3
We are excited to reveal that Mark Forsyth is the author of this year’s specially commissioned essay for IBW Bookseller Collectibles: The Unknown Unknown: Bookshops and the Delight of Not Getting What You Wanted.
IBW Booksellers Collectibles is a range of books provided exclusively for indies to sell during Independent Booksellers Week, which takes place 28th June–5th July. Mark Forsyth explores in this essay why Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy would never have met online, the pleasure of leafing through a dictionary, and why only a bookshop can give you what you never knew you were looking for.
And if that wasn’t enough, we’ll also be publishing the paperback of The Elements of Eloquence early for IBW, exclusively for indies!
Go here to read more. Are you excited for Independent Booksellers Week?!

We are excited to reveal that Mark Forsyth is the author of this year’s specially commissioned essay for IBW Bookseller Collectibles: The Unknown Unknown: Bookshops and the Delight of Not Getting What You Wanted.

IBW Booksellers Collectibles is a range of books provided exclusively for indies to sell during Independent Booksellers Week, which takes place 28th June–5th July. Mark Forsyth explores in this essay why Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy would never have met online, the pleasure of leafing through a dictionary, and why only a bookshop can give you what you never knew you were looking for.

And if that wasn’t enough, we’ll also be publishing the paperback of The Elements of Eloquence early for IBW, exclusively for indies!

Go here to read more. Are you excited for Independent Booksellers Week?!

Lovely review of The Horologicon by Lily! 

From Shakespeare to ho-po: What are your favourite made-up words?

Mark Forsyth is quoted in this Metro article on words: ‘People always make up words if they’re in their own little small environment, where you can give names to little things and everybody will understand.’ Head over to metro.co.uk to read more. 

3 weeks ago - 9
Lovely to see praise for Mark Forsyth from the one and only Margaret Atwood. Let’s vote. Does the man behind @inkyfool remind you of Jimmy?

Lovely to see praise for Mark Forsyth from the one and only Margaret Atwood. Let’s vote. Does the man behind @inkyfool remind you of Jimmy?

prettybooks:

Books for Book Lovers: In Pictures and see the original post.

We spot Mark Forsyth’s The Etymologicon and The Horologicon! 

prettybooks:

Books for Book Lovers: In Pictures and see the original post.

We spot Mark Forsyth’s The Etymologicon and The Horologicon

The Elements of Eloquence

The Elements of Eloquence

then-fate-fell-short:

the elements of eloquence - mark forsyth

Lovely handwritten quote from Mark Forsyth’s The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase.

then-fate-fell-short:

the elements of eloquence - mark forsyth

Lovely handwritten quote from Mark Forsyth’s The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase.

gobookyourself:

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

For more elegant, witty writing from a hundred years ago, try these…

Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm for a hilarious fantasy novel about all the men in Oxford killing themselves out of love for one beautiful woman

Antic Hay by Aldous Huxley for an incredibly intelligent book about inflatable underpants

Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh for adventures of an innocent man in a deliciously sinful world

The Diary of a Nobody by George & Weedon Grossmith for ponderings from the suburb

This post was guest edited by writer Mark Forsyth. His latest book, The Elements of Eloquence, is out now. You can find him on Twitter.

Get the email | Buy us a coffee

Mark Forsyth was a guest editor over at Go Book Yourself today!